Wanderlust

Josh LowTravelling. That’s what I love. The notion of adventure excites me. To me there’s nothing more frightening yet appealing than stepping off a bus or a train in a foreign land, not knowing where I was supposed to go exactly. It’s like an addiction, known by most as wanderlust, and I was sucked in like countless others before me who’d wandered out into our beautiful world. I spent nine months travelling through South America and Europe and had some incredible experiences while abroad. Over my travels, I also encountered God in many events and people I came across, which absolutely blew my mind. Looking back at it now, God’s hand in my journey was so apparent, even if I couldn’t see it at the time. But more on that later…

So why do I love travelling so much? Well for one thing, I believe that travelling not only opens your eyes to different places around the world, but to the people in those places too. Through travelling you’re allowed the opportunity to experience different cultures and ways of life. It can be a real eye opener in some cases, especially when seeing situations of poverty and a huge difference in the quality of life as compared to the comforts of home. I realised while away how fortunate we are here in Australia after coming across people from all walks of life, and sharing experiences on the road.

Not only does it open our eyes, but I think that one can find out a lot about themselves while on the move. In troublesome situations you may discover how you would react in them. You could even surprise yourself and find strength or determination you never realised you had, and can really learn more about you as a person in many various ways. After travelling for what has been, in total, a fairly large amount of time in my life, I’ve learnt the value of communication and listening to others, along with patience and the idea of “Que sera, sera” or “Whatever will be, will be”, accepting situations in life with a positive outlook even when problems arise.

I’ve come to see all experiences as good experiences, and really believe that every experience, no matter how bad it may seem, is a good one, because in the end you can learn and grow as a person. When travelling with others, especially for an extended period of time, that’s when your friendships are really put to the test. In the words of Mark Twain, “I have found out that there ain’t no surer way to find out whether you like people or hate them than to travel with them.” I realised that it could not be any truer, and have discovered both sides of the coin while on the move with others.

Some people like to travel in groups with friends, for the sense of a kind of security in numbers. I mean sure, it’s nice to have people close to you in life share valuable experiences, but personally, I have no desire to travel in a group. To me, the more people you have travelling together, the more differing and divided opinions you get when it comes to making decisions. After travelling in groups in the past I decided that I wanted to go it alone. There is a sort of a feeling of freedom attached to it, which was the biggest attraction for me in my decision to travel alone, and boy did it fulfil every expectation I had.

I ran into random people along the way with connections to home, bumped into old friends, I managed to meet my family on the road, and when I didn’t have my family around, funnily enough there was always someone else that ended up making me feel so at home. All the time it was like God was really watching over me and having my back. Along the way there were certain situations I got caught in, which were not exactly the safest. When I left Perth in July last year, little did I know what was about to unfold which absolutely changed my life.

To be continued……….